Aggression In Cortunix Quail

Aggression In Cortunix Quail

Warning: At the end of this post are some pictures of quail injuries in a gallery. They are graphic; however, both quails are doing very well and I expect a full recovery. As the expression on Walker’s face shows (Yes, he has a name. Walker (Texas A&M Quail...
Episode 7: Interview with Marian L. Thorpe (Bonus Material)

Episode 7: Interview with Marian L. Thorpe

In this episode I interview historical fantasy author Marian L. Thorpe. We chat about agricultural history, the animals (including horses) in her books, and her writing. We also talk chickens a bit. I hope you enjoy our conversation. In the bonus conversation...
Episode 7: Interview with Marian L. Thorpe (Bonus Material)

Research Books For World Building

I’m finishing up my AS in Agriculture degree with this semester and the fall semester to go. This semester I’m taking the last of my agriculture classes: AGR215 (Soils) and AGR297 (Global Agriculture). It’s the second class, the capstone class of the...
Episode 6: Rethinking Livestock

Episode 6: Rethinking Livestock

In this episode I encourage you to think outside the box, or rather outside the field, when it comes to livestock. What about people in small spaces? How about urban livestock keeping? I discuss raising livestock like Madagascar Hissing Cockroaches and B. Dubia...

Recycling In World Building

On Monday I posted about how I recycle shredded paper in the chicken coop and promised that I’d follow up with how you can use this for your world building. So here we are! Now you can take this as a direct relationship where your print makers or your scribes...
Episode 7: Interview with Marian L. Thorpe (Bonus Material)

Episode 5: Growing Seasons

Welcome to episode 5. Sorry for the break last week. College started up again, and the two agriculture classes I’m taking to finish the AS in Ag are pretty “busywork intensive” so I had to make sure my schedule was in order and missed out on doing an...

Recycling on the Homestead

We recycle and compost as much as possible. Living out in the country there isn’t curbside recycling, but I can take our recycling into the nearest town and drop it off when I need to go there, usually once a month. You might wonder what this has to do with your...